Internet users in Cuba — the few who have access to the web, that is — can now download Google's popular browser Chrome.

Google announced that it made Chrome available in Cuba on Wednesday, blaming the delay on U.S. export controls and sanctions against the communist country.

The Cuban government claims 25% of its citizens have access to the Internet, but that's assuming people that can go to a government-controlled facility. The more realistic number is 5%, according to online freedom watchdog Freedom House...


Recent Articles

Date Title
10/30/14 U.S. attends Ebola meeting in Cuba called by leftist bloc
Reuters
10/30/14 In Cuba, a new church, a ray of hope
Alan Gomez, USA Today
10/29/14 Cuba tries to drive up fertility amid baby slump
AP, The Washington Post
10/29/14 Cuba's Roofs, Small Spaces of Freedom
Yoani Sanchez, The Huffington Post
10/29/14 Another exodus of Cubans in the making
Fabiola Santiago, The Miami Herald
10/27/14 The Shifting Politics of Cuba Policy
Editorial Opinion, The New York Times
10/22/14 Lech Walesa Meets Cuban Democracy Activists in Warsaw
Yoani Sanchez, The Huffington Post
10/21/14 From Havana, a Prominent Voice for Change
Miriam Leiva, The New York Times
10/21/14 Cuba should not be rewarded for denying freedom to its people
Editorial, The Washington Post
10/20/14 Calling time on America's blockade of Cuba
Will Grant, BBC
10/20/14 Cuba’s Impressive Role on Ebola
Editorial, The New York Times
10/17/14 How Business Can Change Cuba
Tim Padgett, Businessweek
10/16/14 Rare Independent Group Aims to Open Debate in Cuba
Michael Weissenstein, AP
10/16/14 Cuba to introduce modern, more secure ID cards
EFE
10/15/14 Still Pondering U.S.-Cuba Relations, Fidel Castro Responds
Ernesto Lodoño, The New York Times