Late last month, 44 former high-level U.S. officials and thought leaders, including prominent members of the Cuban-American community, signed a letter to President Barack Obama urging him to revise our Cuba policy to allow Americans to better engage with the island’s growing civil society, particularly its fledgling entrepreneurial sector.

The logic behind the letter is simple: by empowering the Cuban people with more access to U.S. contacts and resources, they can create greater freedoms for themselves.

Unfortunately, that concept appears to be too difficult to understand for those who depend on keeping things just the way they are. Almost immediately, the predictable responses began to flow from a tag team of shrill hardliners in Washington DC and Havana, all trying to protect the status quo...



Recent Articles

Date Title
12/17/14 Cuba Study Group Applauds Historic Steps Taken by the U.S. and Cuba
Cuba Study Group
12/16/14 Building the new Cuban economy
Mimi Whitfield, Miami Herald
12/15/14 Much unfinished work remains as Cuba reforms its economy
Mimi Whitfield, Miami Herald
12/15/14 Cuba’s Economy at a Crossroads
Editorial Board, The New York Times
12/15/14 Cuban Scholars in U.S. Can’t Get Bank Accounts
Ernesto Lodoño, The New York Times
12/12/14 Cuban rapper denies receiving money from USAID
Nora Gamez Torres, El Nuevo Herald
12/12/14 Why USAID Got Into Bed With Cuban Rappers
Elias Groll, Foreign Policy
12/12/14 Why I changed my mind about Cuba
Carmen Cusido, CNN
12/11/14 On Human Rights Day in Cuba: Instead of Bread and Circuses, We Get Beer and Repression
Yoani Sanchez, The Huffington Post
12/11/14 Timeline of US involvement in Cuban hip-hop
AP
12/11/14 U.S. Secretly Infiltrated Cuba's Hip-Hop Scene To Spark Anti-Government Movement: Report
Desmond Butler, Michael Weissenstein, Laura Wides-Munoz and Andrea Rodriguez, AP
12/9/14 New comedy wave tests limits on criticism in Cuba
Anne Marie Garcia, AP
12/5/14 Internet in Cuba only for the rich -- or resourceful
Alexandre Grosbois, AFP