Late last month, 44 former high-level U.S. officials and thought leaders, including prominent members of the Cuban-American community, signed a letter to President Barack Obama urging him to revise our Cuba policy to allow Americans to better engage with the island’s growing civil society, particularly its fledgling entrepreneurial sector.

The logic behind the letter is simple: by empowering the Cuban people with more access to U.S. contacts and resources, they can create greater freedoms for themselves.

Unfortunately, that concept appears to be too difficult to understand for those who depend on keeping things just the way they are. Almost immediately, the predictable responses began to flow from a tag team of shrill hardliners in Washington DC and Havana, all trying to protect the status quo...



Recent Articles

Date Title
3/31/15 U.S. and Cuba to face off on human rights in Tuesday Washington meeting
Mimi Whitefield, The Miami Herald
3/31/15 Pritzker: U.S. business can be at the forefront of change in Cuba
Mimi Whitefield, The Miami Herald
3/31/15 Cuba aims to ramp up Internet access -U.S. State Dept official
David Adams, Reuters
3/30/15 Who claims what property seized in Cuba? Facts and figures
Adam Geller, AP
3/29/15 Tampa could prosper from restoring cattle trade with Cuba
Tampa Tribune
3/26/15 Cuban dissidents will head to Summit of the Americas
Nora Gamez, The Miami Herald
3/26/15 Venezuela slashes oil shipments to Cuba, Caribbean in half
Antonio Maria Delgado, The Miami Herald
3/23/15 Obama Outmaneuvered Hardliners to Cut a Cuba Deal
Reuters, Newsmax
3/23/15 Giving Cubans a chance
Parris N. Glendening, Baltimore Sun
3/23/15 Cuba flirts with free speech
Marc Frank, Financial Times
3/19/15 Questions Over US-Cuba Talks Amid Venezuela Dispute
Peter Orsi and Andrea Rodriguez, AP
3/19/15 Can the US-Cuba honeymoon last?
Howard LaFranchi, Christian Science Monitor