The United States ought to have the flexibility to use the broad range of foreign policy tools at its disposal to respond to developments anywhere in the world as they occur. This means it should be able to take targeted, clear actions when they can make a difference. When it comes to Cuba, such actions should aim to influence the Cuban government, empower Cuban civil society, and advance our national interests in the region.

Instead, America's hands are tied by an overreaching law that makes all of the above incredibly difficult and often impossible: the Helms-Burton Act of 1996...



Recent Articles

Date Title
8/27/15 Cuba’s Internet dilemma: how to emerge from the Web’s stone age
Indira Lakshmanan, Bloomberg
8/26/15 Cuba Suffers Through The Worst Drought Of ‘The Last Century’
Dominique Mosbergen, The Huffington Post
8/26/15 Carnival's Fathom Sailing Toward Cuba 'To Make A Social Impact'
Devin Thrope, Forbes
8/24/15 Cuban Dissidents Buoyed in a New Era
Ernesto Londoño, The New York Times
8/21/15 If you want to do business in Cuba, call these guys
CNN Money
8/21/15 Pope Francis’ trip to Cuba will focus on families, the young and strengthening the church
Mimi Whitefield, The Miami Herald
8/21/15 A Breakout Year for Cuban Entrepreneurs
Indira Lakshmanan, Bloomberg
8/20/15 Congressional Recalcitrance on Cuba Deprives U.S. Business Community of Opportunities
John Brinkley, Forbes
8/20/15 Restored relations hold benefits for Cuba, U.S.
Editorial Opinion, Orlando Sentinel
8/19/15 Cuba: Investing in the New Frontier
Josh Lockman and Jaime Carlson, The Huffington Post
8/19/15 No timing for resuming commercial travel to Cuba- U.S.
Reuters
8/18/15 Cuba: Now comes the hard part
Carl Meacham, Politico
8/18/15 Obama Administration Pushes for Deal to Start Flights to Cuba by Year’s End
Felicia Schwartz, Jack Nicas and Carlo Lee, The Wall Street Journal
8/17/15 Will tourism spoil Cuba's environment?
Orlando Sentinel
8/14/15 Cuban chefs fire up the grills for fundraiser
WSVN