The United States ought to have the flexibility to use the broad range of foreign policy tools at its disposal to respond to developments anywhere in the world as they occur. This means it should be able to take targeted, clear actions when they can make a difference. When it comes to Cuba, such actions should aim to influence the Cuban government, empower Cuban civil society, and advance our national interests in the region.

Instead, America's hands are tied by an overreaching law that makes all of the above incredibly difficult and often impossible: the Helms-Burton Act of 1996...



Recent Articles

Date Title
1/28/15 Roberta Jacobson On MSNBC: 'It's About Empowering Cuban People'
MSNBC
1/28/15 Marco Rubio schedules Senate hearing on U.S.-Cuba policy
Patricia Mazzei, The Miami Herald
1/28/15 Outside Havana, a less sunny view of new U.S.-Cuba ties
Rick Jervis, USA Today
1/28/15 American Airlines interested in offering flights to Cuba
AP
1/28/15 Cuba's Castro warns U.S. against meddling in internal affairs
Enrique Pretel, Reuters
1/26/15 The agenda in Cuba
Editorial Opinion, The Miami Herald
1/26/15 Tech eyes Cuban payda
Julian Hattem, The Hill
1/24/15 As normalization talks begin, Cubans begin anticipating changes to come
Karen DeYoung, Washington Post
1/24/15 Jacobson: Much riding on efforts to restore relations with Cuba
Mimi Whitefield, The Miami Herald
1/23/15 U.S. presses Cuba on human rights in talks on restoring ties
Daniel Trotta and Lesley Wroughton, Reuters
1/23/15 U.S. says mistrust must be overcome to restore Cuba ties
Lesley Wroughton and Daniel Trotta, Reuters
1/22/15 Havana: U.S. immigration policy for Cubans needs to change
Mimi Whitefield, The Miami Herald
1/22/15 U.S. and Cuba Set to Discuss Diplomatic Ties
Randal Archibold, The New York Times
1/22/15 Miami-Dade commission asks Congress to revise Cuban Adjustment Act
Patricia Mazzei, Miami Herald Blog
1/22/15 A Better Cuba is More Possible Than Ever
Pedro Campos, 14yMedio