(Reuters) - The resignation of two editors of an outspoken Roman Catholic Church magazine in Cuba threatens to stall what had been a thriving political dialogue inside Cuba and a rare forum to challenge the ruling Communist Party publicly.

The former editors of Espacio Laical magazine, Roberto Veiga and Lenier Gonzalez, used the Internet to promote debate on political issues such as the need for a multiparty system, internet expansion, reintegration with the diaspora and the strengths and weaknesses of reforms under President Raul Castro...



Recent Articles

Date Title
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1/30/15 White House: No, Castro, you can't have Guantanamo back
Jim Acosta, CNN
1/30/15 U.S.-Cuba Travel Could Happen 'Within the Year'
Gabrielle Levy, U.S. News & World Report
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Tim Johnson, McClatchy
1/28/15 Roberta Jacobson On MSNBC: 'It's About Empowering Cuban People'
MSNBC
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Patricia Mazzei, The Miami Herald
1/28/15 Outside Havana, a less sunny view of new U.S.-Cuba ties
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1/28/15 American Airlines interested in offering flights to Cuba
AP
1/28/15 Cuba's Castro warns U.S. against meddling in internal affairs
Enrique Pretel, Reuters
1/26/15 The agenda in Cuba
Editorial Opinion, The Miami Herald
1/26/15 Tech eyes Cuban payda
Julian Hattem, The Hill
1/24/15 As normalization talks begin, Cubans begin anticipating changes to come
Karen DeYoung, Washington Post
1/24/15 Jacobson: Much riding on efforts to restore relations with Cuba
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1/23/15 U.S. presses Cuba on human rights in talks on restoring ties
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