Cuba has relaxed restrictions on the sale of imported cars, but ordinary citizens cannot afford them. In a dusty Havana parking lot, a group of Cubans examine the prices of the modern cars they can now buy from the state for the first time: $263,000 for a 2013 Peugeot saloon that retails in Europe for $30,000, or $20,000 for a 2002 Fiat Uno with over 100,000km on the clock.



Recent Articles

Date Title
10/21/14 From Havana, a Prominent Voice for Change
Miriam Leiva, The New York Times
10/21/14 Cuba should not be rewarded for denying freedom to its people
Editorial, The Washington Post
10/20/14 Calling time on America's blockade of Cuba
Will Grant, BBC
10/20/14 Cuba’s Impressive Role on Ebola
Editorial, The New York Times
10/17/14 How Business Can Change Cuba
Tim Padgett, Businessweek
10/16/14 Rare Independent Group Aims to Open Debate in Cuba
Michael Weissenstein, AP
10/16/14 Cuba to introduce modern, more secure ID cards
EFE
10/15/14 Still Pondering U.S.-Cuba Relations, Fidel Castro Responds
Ernesto Lodoño, The New York Times
10/15/14 Fidel Castro reprints NY Times embargo editorial
AP, The Washington Post
10/14/14 As times change, Cuban exiles in the U.S. learn it’s possible to go home again
Stephen Wicary, The Globe and Mail
10/14/14 The Castros Are Responsible for Cuba’s Failures, Not the U.S.
Jorge Benitez, The New York Times
10/14/14 Democracy Can’t Take Root in Isolation
Chris Sabatini, The New York Times
10/14/14 U.S. Engagement With Cuba Is Worth the Risk
Ted Henken, The New York Times
10/14/14 Obama Should End the Embargo on Cuba
Editorial, The New York Times
10/14/14 Cuba Doesn’t Deserve Normal Diplomatic Relations
Carlos Alberto Montaner, The New York Times